Environment

//Environment
Environment 2018-01-15T00:37:36+00:00

Richmond enjoys a Mediterranean climate where summers are longer than winters and winters are mild. Highs are 57 to 73 °F (14 to 23 °C) and the lows are 43 to 56 °F (6 to 13 °C) year round. The rainy season begins in November and ends at the beginning of April.

Because of this wonderful climate and the 32 miles of shoreline on San Francisco Bay, Richmond boasts a beautiful environment for visitors. Richmond has three regional shoreline parks where you can walk or run your dog, swim, fish and picnic and over 49 neighborhood parks. At the shoreline, there is a lot of nature to discover from the Snowy Egret to the Black-tail Hare living among the native grasses and prairie plants. Salt tolerant plants such as pickleweed and orange–colored dodder coexist with marshbirds and mammals along the coast’s tidal marsh. Canadian geese drop by for a visit on their annual migrations and harbor seals can be spotted in the rocky craggy parts of the shoreline.

A fishing license is required in places other than the piers. People catch crabs, sturgeon, perch, flounders and more. Rainbow trout have returned to San Pablo and Wildcat creeks. Red-tailed hawks and Monarch Butterflies fill the air at different times of year.

Down in Shipyard #3 on Canal Blvd, a Whirley Crane adjacent to the SS Red Oak Victory is home to the Ospreys, who return each year to build their nest atop the crane. In the Marina Bay Park area, Meeker Tidal Creek is one of the most productive ecosystems with Bay and fresh water providing the perfect food environment for sediment dwelling animals and microorganisms that produce the foundation of the food chain. Here visitors may see a Grey Fox, Barn Owl, Pacific Treefrog or a skunk. Mallards. Long Billed Curlews and Green-winged Teals, Black Oystercatchers egrets and heron thrive here.

And of course, the San Francisco Bay Trail offers visitors access to hiking, walking and biking to immerse yourself in nature, view the sanctuary for shorebirds and capture the beautiful vistas across the Bay.

Richmond
66°
clear sky
humidity: 64%
wind: 16mph NNW
H 63 • L 59
63°
Thu
57°
Fri
57°
Sat
57°
Sun
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

Neighborhoods

So you made it to Richmond! But where, exactly, are you? It’s not easy to get your bearings right way, but if you know which neighborhood you’re in, it might help you get a better lay of the land!

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Indigenous Plants & Wildlife

Richmond is home to many species of animals. Canada geese visit the city on their annual migrations. Harbor seals live in the Castro Rocks and pigeons and gulls populate the sidewalks and parking lots. Tadpoles and frogs can be found in the local creeks and vernal pools. Field mice and lizards are also found. Herons and egrets nest in protected areas on Brooks Island. Deerfalconsraccoonsducksfoxesowls, and mountain lions live in Wildcat Canyon and Point Pinole Regional Shoreline.

A license is needed for fishing on the waterfront or city waters but not on the piers, where in addition to crabssturgeon are plentiful and manta rays may also be found. Striped bassbat raysleopard sharks, surf perchjacksmeltsturgeonwhite croaker, and floundersare also found.[34] Richmond is one of the few places where you can find the rare Olympia oyster on the west coast, in the polluted waters along the refinery’s shoreline. Rainbow trout have recently returned to San Pablo and Wildcat creeks.[35]

Red-tailed hawks patrol the skies. Monarch butterflies migrate through the city on their journey between Mexico and Canada. Wildcat Marsh has two ponds where Canada geese often rest, and is also the home of the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse and California clapper rail. Another endangered species in the city is the Santa Cruz tarweed which survives alongside Interstate 80. Wildcat Canyon also hosts falcons and vultures. Threatened black rails also live in the city’s marshes.[36]

After a baby grey whale was beached on the Point Richmond shore in May 2007, its rotting corpse became bothersome to neighbors. It took a while to remove it since various agencies argued over which would have to pay for it.[37][38][39][40]

Richmond is also home to one of the last pristine moist grassland habitats in the entire Bay Area at the former Campus Bay UC Berkeley Field Station near Meeker Slough.[41] Richmond residents, however, have limited access to other environmental benefits. Because of the refineries located in Richmond, air quality is particularly low, and residents are especially at risk of air-pollution-related health issues.[42]

In 2006 the city was sued by an environmental group for dumping raw sewage into the Bay. Councilmember Tom Butt was very vocal on the subject accusing the city council of turning a blind eye to the problem.[43]

Mayor McLaughlin has set a goal of installing five megawatts of solar photovoltaic generation in Richmond.[44]

Otters at the Richmond Marina

Osprey Cam

Climate

Richmond enjoys a Mediterranean climate where summers are longer than winters and winters are mild. Highs are 57 to 73 °F (14 to 23 °C) and the lows are 43 to 56 °F (6 to 13 °C) year round. The rainy season begins in November and ends at the beginning of April.

Because of this wonderful climate and the 32 miles of shoreline on San Francisco Bay, Richmond boasts a beautiful environment for visitors. Richmond has three regional shoreline parks where you can walk or run your dog, swim, fish and picnic and over 49 neighborhood parks. At the shoreline, there is a lot of nature to discover from the Snowy Egret to the Black-tail Hare living among the native grasses and prairie plants. Salt tolerant plants such as pickleweed and orange–colored dodder coexist with marshbirds and mammals along the coast’s tidal marsh. Canadian geese drop by for a visit on their annual migrations and harbor seals can be spotted in the rocky craggy parts of the shoreline.

A fishing license is required in places other than the piers. People catch crabs, sturgeon, perch, flounders and more. Rainbow trout have returned to San Pablo and Wildcat creeks. Red-tailed hawks and Monarch Butterflies fill the air at different times of year.

Down in Shipyard #3 on Canal Blvd, a Whirley Crane adjacent to the SS Red Oak Victory is home to the Osprey, who return each year to build their nest atop the crane. In the Marina Bay Park area, Meeker Tidal Creek is one of the most productive ecosystems with Bay and fresh water providing the perfect food environment for sediment dwelling animals and microorganisms that produce the foundation of the food chain. Here visitors may see a Grey Fox, Barn Owl, Pacific Treefrog or a skunk. Mallards. Long Billed Curlews and Green-winged Teals, Black Oystercatchers egrets and heron thrive here.

And of course, the San Francisco Bay Trail offers visitors access to hiking, walking, biking trails as a means of immersing yourself in nature, the sanctuary for shorebirds and capturing the beautiful vistas across the Bay.

Like most of the Bay Area, Richmond is made up of several microclimates. Southern parts of the city and the ridges receive more fog than northern areas. Summer temperatures are higher in inland areas, where the moderating influence of San Francisco Bay is lessened. The average wind speed is 6–9 miles per hour (10–14 km/h) with stronger winds from March through August; the strongest winds are in June.[29]

The city also enjoys more than 80% sunshine seven months out of the year and 10 with 60% or more. December and January are the darkest months

with about 45% average brightness.[29] The city experiences virtually no snowfall, and brief hail annually.

The city is very humid in the morning with the lowest humidity being in the high 70% range. This may be due to San Francisco Bay’s notorious fog and also the fact that a majority of Richmond lies on a flat coastal plain predominantly consisting of reclaimed tidal marshes, inter-tidal flats, and seep.[32] Morning humidity is 75% to 92% year round; afternoon humidity is more variable. This percentage is in the high 20s to mid 30s (%) May through October (the summer months) and climbs or descends through 40% to 70% during the winter.[29]


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